Norwich GPs become ‘breastfeeding champions’ to support local mums and babies

Dr Clare Aitchison low resMore than half of the GP Practices in Norwich have become accredited in the new Norwich Breastfeeding Friendly Surgery scheme.

It means much more than GP surgeries being somewhere that mums are welcomed to feed their babies naturally. Each practice has GPs who have signed up to be breastfeeding champions. Their aim is to encourage mums to breastfeed their newborns for at least six months – longer if they wish to. They want to offer as much guidance and support as possible so that mums feel empowered to continue breastfeeding, through the good days and through any difficulties.

One of the Norwich GPs who is championing breastfeeding is Dr Clare Aitchison from Magdalen Medical Practice (pictured).

She said: “GPs receive very little training in breastfeeding support yet we are often where new mums turn to for help and advice.

“As a GP but also a mum of three children and a trained breastfeeding peer supporter I know how important breastfeeding is to those who want to do it.

"There are also huge health benefits to both baby and mum, and consequently huge savings that can be made to the NHS through an intervention that is essentially free to do.”

Listen to Dr Clare here

“Healthy Norwich” pumps cash into local groups to help people live healthier lives

Healthy Norwich logoHealthy Norwich, the campaign to help people lead healthier lives, is giving out more than £42,000 in grants to local groups.

The money is being spent on backing 11 projects that will make Norwich a better place to live and work.

This is the third year in a row that Healthy Norwich has given grants to local groups. Most of the projects this year will promote good mental health in Norwich and parts of Broadland.

The money comes from NHS Norwich Clinical Commissioning Group, one of the main partners in Healthy Norwich and is administered by Norfolk Community Foundation.

 

Online help for carers

Carers UK, the five Clinical Commissioning Groups in Norfolk and Norfolk County Council have launched Carer UK Norfolk. This is a free resource available to all people who are unpaid carers in Norfolk to provide resources and guidance to support their caring roles.

Register for our FREE digital resources and get the help you need today.

Caring for a loved one who is ill, disabled or older can be valuable and rewarding, but without the right support, caring can have an impact on your health, your job, your finances and your social life.

We have teamed up with Carers UK to offer carers in our region a comprehensive solution that brings together Carers UK’s digital products and online resources with our own information and support for carers onto a single webpage.

What’s included?

  • About Me: building resilience for carers: an e-learning resource that helps carers identify and build networks of support and promotes their self-care.
  • Jointly: our care co-ordination app for people sharing care.
  • The role of good nutrition when caring for someone: an e-learning course that aims to help carers understand the role of nutrition both for themselves as well as the person they are looking after.
  • Upfront Guide to Caring: a simple assessment tool to guide people new to caring or seeking support for the first time to navigate the Carers UK website.
  • Looking after someone: Carers Rights Guide: which helps carers understand their rights as a carer and where to go for financial or practical help.
  • Being Heard: a self-advocacy guide for carers: which helps carers develop the skills to self-advocate.
  • Technology and care: a suite of resources on technology-enabled products and services that can support care and caring
    Our own information and support resources for carers

We're recruiting for our new Admiral Nurse service

The NHS and Dementia UK are advertising for a senior dementia nurse to lead their new Admiral Nursing service in central Norfolk.

And the amount of money being invested into the service, to help local people live more positively with dementia, has risen by £100,000 to £700,000 a year.